The Contemporary Cinema

The Contemporary Cinema

The Contemporary Cinema

The Contemporary Cinema

Excerpt

This book does not pretend to be a history of the cinema -- hardly even a history of that particularly urgent quarter of the cinema's total existence contained in the years since the war. History ought to be recollected, if not in tranquillity, at least at some distance from the event; and the starting-point of this survey is the confused, exciting, stimulating, and essentially paradoxical situation of the cinema today. More people now watch more film, in the cinema and on television, than ever before. About half the population of this country never actually enter a cinema; yet they accept film, in one form or another, as an unquestioned part of their lives. The fight for peaceful coexistence with television has undeniably weakened Western cinemas industrially. And, at the same time, there have been few periods in film history of greater creative excitement, greater opportunities for artists who want to use the screen for personal statement. Television, it could be argued, is in the process of liberating the cinema. Whether directors such as Michelangelo Antonioni and Ingmar Bergman, Alain Resnais and François Truffaut, have created their audience through their work, or whether the presence of the audience helps to encourage the film-makers, is both arguable and unanswerable.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.