Zakhor, Jewish History and Jewish Memory

Zakhor, Jewish History and Jewish Memory

Zakhor, Jewish History and Jewish Memory

Zakhor, Jewish History and Jewish Memory

Excerpt

Zakhor continues to wend its way, long independent of its author. A Portuguese translation has been published in São Paulo and a Japanese translation is scheduled to appear in Tokyo. Ironically, the first two editions of the English original (1982 and 1989) are out of print. I therefore want to express my deepest thanks to Naomi Pascal of the University of Washington Press, who took the initiative in reissuing the present edition from its first home, thereby making the English version available once again.

Of the discussions of the book that have appeared since the second edition I would single out Amos Funkenstein's Collective Memory and Historical Consciousness, in History and Memory, vol. 1, no. 1 (1989) and Robert Chazan's The Timebound and the Timeless:
Medieval Jewish Narration of Events, ibid., vol. 6, no. 1 (1994). See also the response to Funkenstein's critique by David N. Myers, Remembering Zakhor:
A Super-Commentary, and Funkenstein's reply, ibid., vol. 4, no. 2 (1992). While I have found these essays to be especially stimulating, sharpening and clarifying some of the issues that separate me from my critics, they have not persuaded me to alter my positions or to introduce any changes in the text.

I would be remiss, however, if I did not record here with considerable pride that one of my doctoral students at Columbia, David Wachtel, has recently corrected me on an interesting point. I had tacitly assumed that the fast day of the 20th of Sivan (pp. 49-51), commemorating the blood libel at Blois in 1171, had been observed without interruption from its initiation until 1650, when it was applied to the Cossack massacres in Poland. In an unusually sophisticated seminar paper, Mr. Wachtel has argued cogently that this fast was not kept continuously from the twelfth to the seventeenth centuries, but fell into disuse at an early date. On the other hand, he has shown that in the Jewish community of Worms, a fast on the first day of Sivan in memory of the massacres of the First Crusade endured down to modern . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.