Know Thyself

Know Thyself

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Know Thyself

Know Thyself

Read FREE!

Excerpt

"Intelligendo se, intelligit omnia alia." These words, applied to the individual subject, sum up the doctrine which I propose to set forth: a doctrine of the phenomenal universe. Of this doctrine I shall premise a brief summary which, though requiring for its right interpretation the developments afforded by the book, will, I think, make it more intelligible. To begin with, what is a phenomenon? I see a colour: there is the colour seen, and there is my seeing it. There is, correlated with my vision, a feeling, for instance, of pain. There is my wish that such a feeling should cease. And there is the act by which I contrive to make it cease (for instance, the act of turning my head). Lastly, there is my cognition of all this. The colour, the feeling, the vision, etc., are commonly considered as so many phenomena. And that all these, as well as many other facts of the same kind, are separate phenomena, is quite obvious. But it is no less obvious that a phenomenon, though separate, has no exact lines: for instance, this colour merges insensibly into that other colour (the surrounding colour); this . . .

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