The Doctor's Disciples: A Study of Four Pupils of Arnold of Rugby: Stanley, Gell, Clough, William Arnold

The Doctor's Disciples: A Study of Four Pupils of Arnold of Rugby: Stanley, Gell, Clough, William Arnold

The Doctor's Disciples: A Study of Four Pupils of Arnold of Rugby: Stanley, Gell, Clough, William Arnold

The Doctor's Disciples: A Study of Four Pupils of Arnold of Rugby: Stanley, Gell, Clough, William Arnold

Excerpt

In a letter to Arthur Stanley, Dr Arnold's most distinguished disciple, Benjamin Jowett once wrote: 'Arnold's peculiar danger was not knowing where his ideas would take other people or ought to take himself.' This book is the story of four people whom this 'peculiar danger' affected in various ways: Stanley himself, who became Dean of Westminster; John Philip Gell, who tried to transplant Rugby ideals to Van Diemen's Land; Arthur Hugh Clough, 'our own Rugby poet' as Tom Hughes called him; and the Doctor's fourth son, William Delafield Arnold, who at the close of his short life was the first Director of Education in the Punjab.

It is a story of the men, not of Arnold's influence on them: but since that influence was the most important single factor in their lives, a chapter has been included on Arnold himself. This is of a different character from the other chapters and may be read before or after them or omitted altogether. It is best regarded as an overture, distinct from the work itself but introducing the subsequent themes.

The recurring theme throughout is the quest for truth. But 'Is sincerity to be the test of truth, or truth to be the test of sincerity?' asked Arthur Stanley's mother, and could only reply, 'It is the very keystone of the whole mystery of our being.' Pilate's question still stays for an answer.

FRANCES J. WOODWARD

SAWSTON, CAMBRIDGE November 1953 . . .

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