Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

Religion and the Cure of Souls in Jung's Psychology

Excerpt

In a book by J. Gebser, the statement is made that the psychology of C. G. Jung, regarded scientifically, is the nearest approach to religion. "The future will show," he says, "whether this psychological re-connexion (religio) can give rise to a spiritual one; whether the scientific course of subjective knowledge can lead without a break to the world of objective faith, which moulds the heart. In the fact-for this much can now be said for certain-that it is no longer exclusively. 'psychology' in the scientific sense intended by Freud, but can already lay claim to the title of a teaching concerning the soul, lies the significance of Jung's 'complex psychology.' " Gebser, probably quite rightly, is chary of seeing in Jung's psychology a new religion, but for him Jung has introduced man's religious need into psychology. He has amplified Freud's idea of libido, which on the positive plane worked out as life-instinct and on the negative as death-instinct, and the amplification resulted in the recognition of a religious instinct. Thereby Jung's view of the soul became what Gebser calls the nearest approach to religion. Gebser makes this judgement in a book that offers a conspectus of the results of modern research in physics, biology, and psychology; and thus unwittingly he points to the conclusion, or at least tacitly implies, that through the mouth of Jung modern psychology begins to speak as the knower and . . .

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