Lectures on Ancient History: From the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus. Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 2

Lectures on Ancient History: From the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus. Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Lectures on Ancient History: From the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus. Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 2

Lectures on Ancient History: From the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus. Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians and Carthaginians - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

"The power which his birth could no longer secure to him, he endeavoured to obtain from the people. This demagogy of aristocrats by birth is not uncommon; we find it, for example, in the history of the French revolution." For this purpose he allied himself with a friend, Ephialtes.

"The source of his power lay in the magic of his eloquence and" in the fact that he applied the treasures and the wealth of the republic to the personal comfort of the people. "He adorned the city with buildings and works of art of every kind; and there can be no doubt, that his πολιτεία had great influence upon the embellishment of the drama. But with all this, he was a faithful administrator of the public property, and very skilfully increased the sources of the revenue; he contributed much to the wealth and comfort of the people.

Pericles has often been compared with Lorenzo de Medici, and that very justly; but Lorenzo is inferior to Pericles, who was not indeed a great man, but a distinguished man, and great as a statesman, full of great and brilliant ideas.

LECTURE XLII.

To call the most brilliant period of Athenian history "the age of Pericles," is indeed a modern idea, and the expression does not occur in antiquity, but it is perfectly appropriate. The name of the man who is in the possession of the greatest power, fully and accurately indicates the character of his age. If we look a little back to the time of Themistocles and Cimon, we perceive the greatest difference between it and that of Pericles. In the latter period, the age of art and perfection manifests itself in every respect; men advance and are conscious of it, continuing that of which the foundations lie in the past, and working out their own cultivation in every way.

His age, moreover, witnessed the great change, by which Athens became so entirely the centre of Greek intellect; something of a similar nature is found in Germany, nay, even in France. Before the time of Pericles, Greek intelligence, culture, and genius, were the common property of the whole . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.