Miti and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925-1975

Miti and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925-1975

Miti and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925-1975

Miti and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of Industrial Policy, 1925-1975

Synopsis

Positioning Statement: An explosive account of the resentments American policies are sowing around the world and of the payback that will be our harvest in the twenty-first century The hardcover received great review and media coverage. The author is incredibly well-connected and in constant demand as a speaker. The perfect match of author and subject.

Excerpt

Perhaps the oldest and most basic subject in the study of political economy is the relationship between governmental institutions and economic activity. The distinctions in this field lie at the heart of all modern political analysis: free trade versus mercantilism, socialism versus capitalism, laissez faire versus social goal setting, the public sector versus the private sector--and, ultimately, a concern with procedures (liberty) versus a concern with outcomes (equality). Japan occupies a preeminent place in this discussion as both a model and a case. Japan's postwar economic triumph--that is, the unprecedented economic growth that has made Japan the second most productive open economy that has ever existed--is the best example of a state-guided market system currently available; and Japan has itself become a model, in whole or in part, for many other developing or advanced industrial systems.

The focus of this book is on the Japanese economic bureaucracy, particularly on the famous Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), as the leading state actor in the economy. Although MITI was not the only important agent affecting the economy, nor was the state as a whole always predominant, I do not want to be overly modest about the importance of this subject. The particular speed, form, and consequences of Japanese economic growth are not intelligible without reference to the contributions of MITI. Collaboration between the state and big business has long been acknowledged as the defining characteristic of the Japanese economic system, but for too long the state's role in this collaboration has been either condemned as overweening or dismissed as merely supportive, without anyone's . . .

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