Pan America in Crisis: The Future of the OAS - Vol. 4

Pan America in Crisis: The Future of the OAS - Vol. 4

Pan America in Crisis: The Future of the OAS - Vol. 4

Pan America in Crisis: The Future of the OAS - Vol. 4

Excerpt

In this study Dr. William Manger writes with the authority of one who has devoted most of his life to the service of the oldest international organization of our times. There is probably no one in the hemisphere who has such a thorough knowledge of the political institution created by the nations in this part of the world to provide the machinery for conducting their relations in close collective cooperation. He entered the Pan American Union as a very young man, and through study, ability, and an intelligent utilization of his experience, he steadily rose until he achieved the high office of Assistant Secretary General of the Organization of American States.

I have known few instances of such complete dedication to furthering the aims and purposes of an international organization as that of Dr. Manger. As an aide to Dr. L. S. Rowe, who for so many years held the post of Director General of the Pan American Union, and later as Assistant Secretary General of the OAS, Dr. Manger attended almost all the important inter-American conferences from 1923 on. It is safe to say that there is no basic document in the history of the modern inter-American system in whose formulation Dr. Manger has not participated. In his capacity as Secretary of the Council of the OAS he witnessed, and on not a few occasions took part in the most complicated discussions on the application of the juridical standards laid down by the inter-American conferences. No one was better qualified than he to interpret a text on the basis of its background, its origin, its motivation, its intent. Dr. Manger's understanding of the history of inter-American relations of the last forty years is not only intellectual, but something also sensitive and human. Such is his consecrated devotion to the inter-American organization that his biography is almost inseparable from episodes in the history of relations between the countries of the Hemisphere.

It is with such authority that Dr. Manger has written this book, which is part history, part criticism, and a wholly acute and extremely clear political analysis of the positions of the different governments-- particularly that of his own country, the United States--in the long period that has elapsed between the Congress of Panama of 1826 and President Kennedy's statements at the beginning of 1961. The con-

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