Human Performance and Productivity: Stress and Performance Effectiveness

Human Performance and Productivity: Stress and Performance Effectiveness

Human Performance and Productivity: Stress and Performance Effectiveness

Human Performance and Productivity: Stress and Performance Effectiveness

Excerpt

The universal goal of continuous improvement in quality of life is keyed to the enhancement of productivity. In simplest human terms, increased productivity translates as improvement in output generated by each unit of effort, with concommitant reduction in unit cost. The assumption is that, as the people who constitute a social and economic entity generate more output than other comparable entities, their relative standard of living will improve. For the unit of effort they expend, more goods and services become available, the amount of free time they have available to make use of these goods and services is increased, and the choice of alternative uses of the products and services is expanded -- (i.e., life's quality is improved).

In industrial societies, increases in productivity are accounted for largely by capital investment strategies. Machinery multiplies man's output many fold. Theoretically, therefore, more people can be released from the "bondage of labor" for more time to "enjoy life."

However, though we hail the advent of the postindustrial society, in which substantially all our essential human needs will be produced without a great amount of human effort, the fact remains that the millennium is not here yet. Human beings are not yet obsolescent as important contributors to the productive process. The quality of performance by men and women, whether in manufacturing or servicing, still accounts for a very large part of the variation in productivity, however one chooses to define the criteria of productivity -- and this condition will continue to prevail far into the future. As a matter of fact, as our social and economic system becomes proportionately less oriented to the production of goods and more to the provision of services, the "human element" takes on added importance and new meaning -- including perhaps some revision of the . . .

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