Under Siege: P.L.O. Decision Making during the 1982 War

Under Siege: P.L.O. Decision Making during the 1982 War

Under Siege: P.L.O. Decision Making during the 1982 War

Under Siege: P.L.O. Decision Making during the 1982 War

Excerpt

It is now apparent that the 1982 war has taken its place with those of 1948, 1967 and 1973 as a watershed in modern Middle Eastern history. This is clear from its drastic effects on all the parties to the conflict, and from the extensive literature devoted to it.

Israel, the war's initiator, was bogged down in Lebanon for three years, spending about $1 million per day on the costs of occupation. Since June 6, 1982, over 650 Israeli soldiers have been killed and almost 4000 wounded. In spite of this high cost, the invasion of Lebanon has not measurably helped Israel to achieve its primary goals vis-à-vis the Palestinians, Lebanon, or Syria, or to advance its security.

For over two months in the summer of 1982, the Israeli army, which on the eve of the invasion was widely and rightfully feared throughout the Arab world, appeared impotent before the gates of Beirut. This impression has been powerfully reinforced by its inability to quell resistance activity in South Lebanon since then.

As a result of this novel demonstration of Israeli military incapacity, and of the questioning inside of Israel of the war's justifiability, there is now doubt whether Israel can sustain its . . .

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