The Saturday Review Treasury

The Saturday Review Treasury

The Saturday Review Treasury

The Saturday Review Treasury

Excerpt

Few written words justify the poet's boast and outlast "eternal bronze." As every journalist knows, all but an infinitesimal minority are writ in water instead.

Most of the time the journalist accepts this sad fact with a shrug. He would hardly be willing to adopt journalism at all if he didn't. Day by day he does his stint, fills his assigned space, and hopes for little more than that what he has written will hold the attention of the reader to the end. Tomorrow, next week, or next month there will be another issue. After all the very word "journalism" means "something written for the day."

Yet most journalists--or at least all who are any good--are pursued by a faint hope. Unlike the poet, they do not dream that every line is immortal. But they do hope, almost pathetically, that some few paragraphs, some sentence, some phrase even, will happen to have been somehow so right that it will be remembered for a year, a generation, or even a century; and that they, too, reading it again years later, will be able to say, "What a genius I had when I wrote that."

Here, then, in this substantial volume, is a selection of pieces published in The Saturday Review which the editors believe to be for one reason or another--for subject matter, felicity of expression, or both--worth preserving for those who may remember them and for those who will be glad to make their acquaintance. Some of the pieces were published as much as a quarter of a century ago. Many . . .

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