The Education of a Diplomat

The Education of a Diplomat

The Education of a Diplomat

The Education of a Diplomat

Excerpt

In 1911 Hugh Wilson entered the Foreign Service of the United States as the private secretary of the Minister to Lisbon. Thence he went to Guatemala, and that fascinating country made an indelible impression on his imagination which is reflected in some of the most charming pages of this book. After a period in the Embassy at Buenos Aires, he was transferred to Europe and, from the Embassy in Berlin, he was privileged to observe at close quarters the reactions of a great nation to the tremendous struggle in which it faced a large part of a hostile world in arms. It was from this point of vantage that he saw the United States drawn into the vortex; and when, with Gerard and the staff of the Embassy, he crossed the frontier on the breaking of diplomatic relations, he saw grim history in the making. After a brief assignment in Vienna, with which we were hastening to a rupture, he was sent to the Legation in Switzerland, perhaps the best international observation post in the world, for the remainder of the war.

After the conclusion of the peace he was sent back to Berlin and to Tokyo, and such was the confidence he had inspired in his superiors in the State Department that he was called upon to play a part in the development of our Foreign Service in Washington and to serve on numerous international commissions. For ten years he was the American Minister in Switzerland, where, as observer and reporter of the plays on the checkerboard of international politics, he has rendered an invaluable service to the country, little known to the general . . .

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