Soviet Trade and Distribution

Soviet Trade and Distribution

Soviet Trade and Distribution

Soviet Trade and Distribution

Excerpt

When the Bolshevik revolution arrived at the beginning of November 1917, Russia had been at war for three years and had already seen another revolution only a few months before. These events had disrupted the economic organisation of the country, industry was in a state of collapse, transport was chaotic, and trade and finance were thoroughly disorganised by the currency inflation practised by the Provisional Government, which in eight months had practically doubled the note issue. No sooner had the Bolshevik Party established the Soviet Government than it found itself involved in civil wars, supported by Allied intervention, which lasted until 1921. For the first few months after seizing power the Soviet Government was unable to make any serious attempt to organise supplies for the general population. Grain and some other essential commodities were declared State monopolies and requisitioned for the use of the Red Army and the workers engaged in making munitions.

In April 1918 the first important step was taken towards organising a system of State distribution of consumers' goods; all the co-operative societies and their stores were converted into a Government trade apparatus, and later on membership of a consumers' co-operative society was made compulsory for the urban population, to whom were . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.