The Foreign Relations of the Federal State

The Foreign Relations of the Federal State

The Foreign Relations of the Federal State

The Foreign Relations of the Federal State

Excerpt

Since the establishment of the United States in 1789, many excellent scholars have lent their talents to an analysis and description of the constitutional and political characteristics of the federal type of government. The questions arising from a division of powers between States and a national government, the delegation and reservation of powers, and the location of sovereignty, through experiment and study, have been satisfactorily answered. Constitutionally, the pattern of federal government has been well drawn.

With the increasing complexity of international affairs, attention is being directed anew to the federal type of government to determine whether it is as well adapted to the conduct of foreign affairs as it is to the solution of domestic problems. The purpose of this study is to reveal the peculiarities of the federal state in international relations. It undertakes, by an analysis of existing federal governments, to discover to what limitations they are subject internationally, and to determine the importance of those limitations.

Throughout the study, the experience of the United States occupies the central position. There are logical justifications for this. Undoubtedly, the United States, from the standpoint of international . . .

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