What's the Matter with New York: A National Problem

What's the Matter with New York: A National Problem

What's the Matter with New York: A National Problem

What's the Matter with New York: A National Problem

Excerpt

More years ago than he likes to remember one of the authors of this book--it doesn't matter which--returned for a brief visit to his native town with all the weight of a very recent college degree upon him plus the sophistication acquired from twelve whole months in the metropolis. To this youth a shrewd old judge imparted information that has stuck, although much else has been forgotten. "Boy," said he, "don't tell me that Tammany could teach us many tricks. Our small town politicians know them all. But the paving supply men do tell me our town has an honest council. When one of our Councilmen contracts to deliver his vote he stays bought even if some late comer offers to raise him."

The obvious moral of this tale is that we are not holding up New York City in this book as a sinner above all other American communities. Indeed, we suspect that the point of our story is that in essence it is typical. Admitting with proper humility that "New York isn't the United States," acknowledging that its sheer size alone gives it certain peculiar problems, accepting at its full value the good old American horror-not-unmixed with fascination at the very name of Tammany, we still affirm that there are dozens of cities, towns, and rural counties that do not need to go to school in the Wigwam in order to learn . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.