Selections from the Brief Mention of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve

Selections from the Brief Mention of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve

Selections from the Brief Mention of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve

Selections from the Brief Mention of Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve

Excerpt

A collection like the present would be incomplete without an account of the life and work of the author. A biographical sketch has therefore been prefixed to these Selections. The record of Gildersleeve's life is largely a record of his work. Since everything that was written by him for publication was published during his lifetime, a fair idea of his life may be obtained from the list of his publications alone. In view of this, as complete a list of these publications as practicable has been appended, and the list must be regarded as an essential part of the biographical sketch. Additional biographical details may be learned from Gildersleeve Formative Influences (1891), The College [of New Jersey] in the Forties (1916), Friedrich Ritachl (1884), Professorial Types (1893), A Novice of 1850 (1912), The Creed of the Old South 1915; and the Selections themselves contain many personal references, for which the Index, under "Gildersleeve," may be consulted. Gildersleeve's career at the University of Virginia has been vividly portrayed by Professor William M. Thornton in his Gildersleeve the Teacher, The University of Virginia Alumni Bulletin, for April, 1924, pages 118-129, and in his Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve at the University of Virginia, The Johns Hopkins Alumni Magazine, for January, 1925, pages 122-126. The second of these papers was read by the author at the Gildersleeve Memorial Meeting, which was held at the Johns Hopkins University, on Sunday, November 16, 1924. At the same meeting, and published in the same magazine, tributes were paid also to Professor Gildersleeve as Friend and Colleague, by the lateDean Griffin (pages 126-129); to Professor Gildersleeve in his relations to the University, by President (then Dean) Ames (pages 129-132); to Gildersleeve as a Teacher, by Professor Francis G. Allinson (pages 132-136); and to Gildersleeve the American Scholar and Gentleman, byProfessor Paul Shorey (pages 136-148). Mention should also be made of Gildersleeve as a Teacher, byJohn Adams Scott, in Proceedings of the American Philological Association for 1925 . . .

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