The Scenewright: The Making of Stage Models and Settings

The Scenewright: The Making of Stage Models and Settings

The Scenewright: The Making of Stage Models and Settings

The Scenewright: The Making of Stage Models and Settings

Excerpt

At the outset it may be just as well to answer a question that has been frequently put to me: Why do you bother with making stage models; won't drawings do just as well? No, is the answer; and the reason is that a drawing is two-dimensional while a model is threedimensional. A drawing is merely a picture in the flat, whereas a model is a cubic visualization of the picture, a miniature representation of facts, combining the qualities of the suggestiveness of a picture along with the tangible reality of an actual scene.

To the scenewright a drawing is merely the means of realizing the model, and the model is the means of realizing the finished set. The experienced scenewright, like an architect, designs in the "round"; and like an architect he is more apt to start with a plan of the stage setting and create his picture around the acting space, than to start with a two dimensional picture and adjust his ground plan to it.

The comparison between the architect and the scenewright is worthy of note inasmuch as their work and the methods of accomplishing this work are almost identical; both must consider their finished creation as a tangible form existing in space. The scene . . .

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