A Constitutional View of the Late War between the States: Its Causes, Character, Conduct, and Results Presented in a Series of Colloquies at Liberty Hall - Vol. 1

A Constitutional View of the Late War between the States: Its Causes, Character, Conduct, and Results Presented in a Series of Colloquies at Liberty Hall - Vol. 1

Read FREE!

A Constitutional View of the Late War between the States: Its Causes, Character, Conduct, and Results Presented in a Series of Colloquies at Liberty Hall - Vol. 1

A Constitutional View of the Late War between the States: Its Causes, Character, Conduct, and Results Presented in a Series of Colloquies at Liberty Hall - Vol. 1

Read FREE!

Excerpt

The purpose of the writer of this work is to present a Constitutional view of the late War between the States of "the Union," known as the "United States of America."

The view is intended to embrace a consideration of the causes, the character, conduct and results of this War, in relation to the nature and character of the joint Government of these States; and of its effects upon the nature and character of this Government, as well as of its effects upon the separate Governments, Constitutions and general internal Institutions of the States themselves. The subject is one that does not fall clearly within the domain of History, in the usual acceptation of that word. The design is rather to deal with the materials of History than to supply them. It is not so much to present any portion of American History, as it is, by Historical analysis, to show what are the principles embodied in those systems of Government established, by the Anglo-Saxons, on this Continent, and to illustrate their singularly happy adaptation, so long as adhered to, to the situation and character of the North American States.

The chief usefulness of History consists in the lessons it teaches, in properly estimating the compound result of the action of the principles of any system of Government upon human conduct, and the counter-action of human conduct upon these principles, in effecting those moral and political changes which mark the type, as well as progress, of civilization, at all times, and in all countries. Mankind cannot live without Society or Association. Organized communities, with Governments of some sort, are no more universal than essential to the existence of the Genus Homo, with all its Species and Varieties, in every age and clime. The organic laws, which enter into the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.