The Divine Vision: Studies in the Poetry and Art of William Blake, Born to November 28th, 1757

The Divine Vision: Studies in the Poetry and Art of William Blake, Born to November 28th, 1757

The Divine Vision: Studies in the Poetry and Art of William Blake, Born to November 28th, 1757

The Divine Vision: Studies in the Poetry and Art of William Blake, Born to November 28th, 1757

Excerpt

The Bicentenary of the birth of William Blake is being celebrated by exhibitions and lectures in various parts of the English-speaking world and by the erection of a memorial in Westminster Abbey designed by Sir Jacob Epstein. To these tributes it has been thought fit to add the publication of a volume of essays and studies dealing with various aspects of Blake's work as a poet and artist by scholars from three continents.

The editor is particularly glad to be able to print at the head of the volume a short poem by the late Walter de la Mare, O.M., which was specially written for this purpose by Mr. de la Mare a few weeks before his death, and is probably the last poem that he wrote. Walter de la Mare is now with William Blake in eternity and it is fitting that his last poetic utterance was a salute to the poet to whose spiritual lineage he surely belonged.

The essays are arranged so as to fail into three main sections. The first two deal with Blake's early lyrics. The essay by Professor Foster Damon, the great American pioneer of modern Blake scholarship, on 'Blake and Milton' forms an appropriate transition to the theme of the major epics, Milton and Jerusalem. A fitting coda to this section is the essay by Piloo Nanavutty (Mrs. P. A. Jungalwalla), the distinguished Indian scholar, on 'William Blake and Hindu Creation Myths'. The last three essays are concerned with Blake as a pictorial artist.

An attempt has been made to select as some of the illustrations to this book pictures of Blake which have not been easily accessible. The great tempera painting discovered at Arlington Court in 1949 entitled 'The Cycle of Life' or 'The Sea of Time and Space' has, it is believed, been used here as a book- illustration for the first time, the beautiful water colour, 'She shall be called Woman', in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, is little known on this side of the Atlantic and the four designs which have been selected by Mr. H. M. Margoliouth to illustrate his article on "Blake's Drawings for Young's Night Thoughts" have never before been reproduced.

The editor wishes, on behalf of the William Blake Bicentenary Committee, at whose request this work was undertaken, to thank the scholars who have contributed their essays to the collection without payment as contributions to the William Blake Bicentenary Fund, to which all the royalties earned by the volume are to be devoted. The main purpose of the fund is to defray the cost of the memorial to be erected in Westminster Abbey.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.