Psychology of Women: A Study of Bio-Cultural Conflicts

Psychology of Women: A Study of Bio-Cultural Conflicts

Psychology of Women: A Study of Bio-Cultural Conflicts

Psychology of Women: A Study of Bio-Cultural Conflicts

Excerpt

Almost every woman alive is aware that she is part of some huge problem. Almost every magazine published has devoted large amounts of space to it. Alternate solutions, offered with great passion, range from salvation in the marketplace to fulfillment in the supermarket. Yet hardly a sound is heard from the professional literature of psychologists; here the problem of the psychology of women has never become a widespread issue.

Years ago, when I was a graduate student in psychology and the mother of two tiny children, I found myself finished with courses and obliged to write a major review of the literature as a preliminary to the doctoral dissertation. Unfortunately, I found myself without a topic--at least without a topic to which I could devote the next two years. It also happened about this time that my college friends, now married and the mothers of toddlers, were sending me letters extolling my uniqueness in going back to school. I wrote back (at length) that there was nothing to it, that the world was full of women doing the same thing (in the microcosm of the university that seemed true), and that if they wanted to, they could do at least as much as I.

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