A Rod for the Back of the Binder: Some Considerations of Binding with Reference to the Ideals of the Lakeside Press

A Rod for the Back of the Binder: Some Considerations of Binding with Reference to the Ideals of the Lakeside Press

A Rod for the Back of the Binder: Some Considerations of Binding with Reference to the Ideals of the Lakeside Press

A Rod for the Back of the Binder: Some Considerations of Binding with Reference to the Ideals of the Lakeside Press

Excerpt

The Extra Binding Department of The Lakeside Press was established in 1921 with the idea that there was a place for a bindery whose standard was simply the best that could be done. We issued a book in 1925 declaring our principles and showing the manner of our decoration at that time, and present here our later work up to and including the year 1927.

Our preference is for simple tooling, although this book shows some elaborate work. It is not possible to show the quality of the forwarding (i. e. the binding itself) in an illustration, hence the tendency of the binder to show his skill in elaborate tooling.

Notable books on book binding are almost entirely on the subject of decoration, its history, bibliography, and identifications with certain binders of the past. The subject of forwarding is touched on only lightly. A real forwarder with a feeling for fine binding and judgment in the details of his work is extremely rare. A finely bound book with a good choice of leather is a thing of beauty in itself, and needs from the designer and finisher a great deal of thought and a small amount of tooling to make it a work of art.

The subject matter of this book treats binding from a new angle, describing those book binding details concerning which mistaken ideas exist or in which bad binding practices are prevalent. These notes were written from the standpoint of the causes of defects developed in a binding when on the bookshelf in an American home. When Mr. de Sauty had read them, he exclaimed, "You are giving them a rod with which to beat us." So be it. Nothing could be better than a clientele of well-armed critics helping us to maintain that standard of quality which we have set up as our practice.

R. R. DONNELLEY & SONS COMPANY

Chicago, 1928 . . .

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