Summit at Teheran

Summit at Teheran

Summit at Teheran

Summit at Teheran

Excerpt

In November 1943, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, and Franklin D. Roosevelt journeyed to Teheran for the first of the wartime summit conferences that would determine the outcome of World War II, begin the rearrangement of the political map of eastern and central Europe, and shape forever the history of Europe and the United States.

In the midst of a terrible world war that had yet to be won, the three leaders of the alliance against Adolf Hitler, together with their chiefs of staff, traveled by ship and by plane, in danger from attack by U-boats and the German Luftwaffe, to a distant city rumored to be crammed with German secret agents.

The long trip was necessary because of a crisis in planning the final strategy for the war against Hitler. Stalin, angry over postponements of Operation OVERLORD and suspecting that Roosevelt and Churchill wanted the Russian armies to bleed to death fighting the Wehrmacht, would not disclose Soviet plans to his allies. For their part, they were alarmed over reports that Stalin might conclude a separate peace treaty with Hitler and divide up Europe just as the Russians and Germans had done in 1939. But Roosevelt convinced himself that he, personally, could overcome Stalin's distrust if they could only meet face to face. If such a meeting could save the alliance, bring victory closer, and ensure postwar peace, then the long, dangerous trip to Teheran had . . .

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