Deadly Enemies: Tobacco and Its Opponents in Australia

Deadly Enemies: Tobacco and Its Opponents in Australia

Deadly Enemies: Tobacco and Its Opponents in Australia

Deadly Enemies: Tobacco and Its Opponents in Australia

Synopsis

"Contrary to popular belief that the ill effects of smoking have not been known until recent times, Ian Tyrrell argues that the anti-smoking movement had strong health as well as moral dimensions in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deadly Enemies is a broad and comprehensive history of tobacco consumption in Australia from the early nineteenth century to the present day. The book draws on oral history, popular fiction and memoirs as well as newspapers and journals from each period covered to present a vivid picture of the cultural context for smoking. Tyrrell shows that the impact of research on the links between smoking and lung cancer was limited until the cult of personal health and fitness and rising medical costs changed smoking behaviour in recent decades. Deadly Enemies' approach presents a concise history for those on both sides of the tobacco debate." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

I have benefited greatly from talking to people about their experiences both as smokers, and in giving up. in the light of their testimony, I have tried to avoid the condescension and irritation that sometimes greets smokers in the modern media for their resilient habits. Non-smoking experience was more familiar to me, but there, too, I have benefited from a range of opinion that indicates the complexities of the non-smoking case. I conducted a series of interviews and, with the help of research assistance, sent out questionnaires to smokers, former smokers and non-smokers to learn more about the practice of smoking. I was particularly interested in issues that were not adequately covered in the print media. Some of these twenty- four people who responded, especially my father-in-law, Kenneth Payne, were acute in their memories of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and had as fine a sense of historical detail as any professional historian. For their assistance with gaining access to individuals for the questionnaires I would like to thank Richard Gowers, Julia Horne, Chris Tyrrell, and Diane Collins. a number of individuals were particularly helpful in answering the questionnaires or responding orally. Some wish to remain anonymous. I would however like to thank especially Robert James Tyrrell, Jim Fleming, Donald Horne, Myfanwy Gollan, Frank Crowley, Leigh Collins, and Beverley Kingston; and for oral comment and conversation, the late TomSoldi . . .

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