Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico

Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico

Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico

Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico

Synopsis

During the dictatorship of Porfirio Déaz, from 1876 to 1911, Mexico underwent modernization, producing a fierce struggle between the traditional and the new and exacerbating class antagonisms. William H. Beezley's absorbing social history of the Porfirian era, Judas at the Jockey Club, examines a broad range of topics from sports to technology as well as the traditional Easter-time Judas burnings that became a primary focus of the strife during these years.

Excerpt

The episodes comprised in this volume result from my attempt to understand the lives of everyday Mexicans in the heyday of progress. Obviously the approach and the techniques are not original with me; I owe a great deal to the scholars and writers cited in the notes. Michael Meyer, Luis González, Rhys Isaac, Fernand Braudel, and Carlo Ginzburg have had an influence on my thinking, although of course they cannot be faulted for the twists I have given to their words and ideas. Several colleagues have tried to get the kinks out of my interpretations. At one time or another, Dirk Raat, John Hart, Joe Hobbs, Mark T. R. Gilderhus, Eric Van Young, Paul Vanderwood, Ray Sadler, Charles Harris, Mike Novak, Rich Slatta, Judy Ewell, and Susan Deeds have all tried. Encounters between persuasion and obstinacy are often pleasurable and I enjoyed their efforts, however futile. Special thanks to Annette Thomlinson and Amy Hosokawa for typing this manuscript. I also owe a debt to Kurt Vonnegut for two of my prevailing notions about history. In Palm Sunday, he recounts the story of the Hungarian physician named Semmelweis, who discovered that the mortality rate in maternity wards could be greatly reduced if the attending medical students would wash their hands with soap and water. When the number of deaths declined, the jealousy and ignorance of the physician's colleagues caused him to be fired; hand washing stopped and the mortality rate once again began to climb. The lesson, Vonnegut tells . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.