Man and His Nature: A Philosophical Psychology

Man and His Nature: A Philosophical Psychology

Man and His Nature: A Philosophical Psychology

Man and His Nature: A Philosophical Psychology

Excerpt

This book is primarily a text for the philosophical psychology or philosophy of man course, but it should also be of interest to the general reader who has some knowledge of the biosocial sciences. It does not presume to teach introductory psychology; the philosophy of human nature is in itself a full task for one term. Nor does it presuppose a knowledge of psychology, as will be clear from the discussion of the independent nature of philosophy in Chapter 1.

Scholastic philosophers often deplore the tendency of textbook authors to copy from one another; they want a fresh approach. On the other hand, in symposia, presidential addresses, and other official activities, the members of the American Psychological Association disagree more and more often with the narrow empiricism of early twentieth-century psychology; they frankly recognize that scientific psychology is "replete with metaphysical commitments" (Berenda, 1957, p. 726).

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