John Dryden's Imagery

John Dryden's Imagery

John Dryden's Imagery

John Dryden's Imagery

Excerpt

This study of Dryden is indebted in a large way to Dryden himself because he talked -- and some writers do not -- about what he was doing and what other writers had done, because he contended for subjects and methods, and because he willingly displayed some of the changes of his mind and art. Samuel Johnson heads a succession of instigative critics without whom the discussion of Dryden could not be what it now is. Assertions by T. S. Eliot, Mark Van Doren, Louis Bredvold, Ruth Wallerstein, E. M. W. Tillyard, and Samuel Holt Monk, beyond those recorded in the text and notes, have jogged my hand and, I hope, my mind. I am indebted, of course, to Dryden's editors, H. T. Swedenberg, Jr., and the late Edward Niles Hooker, to James Kinsley, and particularly to the late George R. Noyes to whom all consideration of Dryden is in debt.

Syracuse University, in the spring of 1959, granted me a leave of absence which helped substantially to bring this study toward final form and publication.

Lewis F. Haines, Director, his wife Helen, Production Manager, and Paul Chalker, Assistant Editor, of the University of Florida Press, have been helpful and kind.

Reference librarians at Yale and at Syracuse have assisted patiently.

Maynard Mack directed this study in its original form as a Yale dissertation; he shed light on every problem that arose.

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