The Human Species: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology

The Human Species: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology

The Human Species: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology

The Human Species: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Excerpt

It has been fun to write this book. It is probably most improper academically to admit this, but it happens to be true. It has been my good fortune to teach a beginning course in anthropology each year that I have taught at all, and I have learned a good deal from this experience. Being introduced to a scientific study of our own species need not be a dull and ponderous business. In fact, it should not be. People are naturally interested in one another, in why humans look and act as they do, and in how they came to be as they are. Physical anthropology attempts to explain the biological background and the biological aspects of mankind. The presentation of basic knowledge and elementary concepts in this field is therefore a standard method of introduction to the field of anthropology as a whole: it is not the only method, but it is a good one, full of wonder and excitement.

This book has grown out of my classroom experience. It contains the sorts of things which I have told my students, and which I have found, by experience, they appreciate. My first thanks must go to them, for they have taught me much.

All of those whose research has led to our increase of knowledge about man's biology, past and present, also deserve acknowledgment. Above all I and all my colleagues owe a debt of gratitude to Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel, one neglected and the other vilified during his lifetime. I, in particular, must thank all of the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.