A Sociological Philosophy of Education

A Sociological Philosophy of Education

A Sociological Philosophy of Education

A Sociological Philosophy of Education

Excerpt

In the following chapter, Dr. Finney presents an interpretation of educational aims and values differing at some important points from the tenets and teachings now generally accepted as guiding principles in American schools. His book will be welcomed, I am sure, by all teachers and other students of education who are open-minded in their attitude and keen to view their professional problems in the light of every reasonable hypothesis.

Against a substantial background comprising the facts, principles, and postulates of sociology, Dr. Finney projects the possibilities and limitations of education. Even those of us who are not sociologists will readily agree, not only that the materials of education are social in their origin and that the process of education is itself very largely a social process, but also that the aims and purposes of education must be expressed primarily in terms of social values and social ideals. Values and ideals are in the province of philosophy rather than in the field of exact science. Both the philosopher with a sociological bent and the sociologist with a philosophical flair should be in a position to give us real help. When we find agreements in the two types of guidance we may be fairly confident of our ground; when we find radical disagreement we may well hesitate to take a dogmatic or a doctrinaire attitude on either side. But both sides, surely, we should know and ponder.

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