The Nation at War

The Nation at War

The Nation at War

The Nation at War

Excerpt

This book is no Apologia for the work of the War Department in the war with the Central Powers. It needs none. It deserves praise, not censure. Critics with neither information nor vision, who cannot see that our successes in France would have been impossible without the mobilization of the resources of the entire nation behind our forces there, are really criticizing the nation when they criticize the War Department. For, in this war, the War Department was the center of a great war-machine, its elements both military and civilian, and was a cross-section of the nation.

I am giving an accurate statement of what was done by the Department from the official records of that period, which were placed at my disposal by Secretary of War Hurley and General Douglas MacArthur, Chief of Staff of the Army. These records are, of course, to a large degree, my own. And I have not trusted my own memory completely in any important particular, but quote exactly from the files of the War Department in such cases.

In March, 1931, I was travelling from New York to Washington to deliver a lecture before the Army War College, giving some of my recollections of the . . .

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