Strategy at Singapore: A Study of the American Council on Public Affairs

Strategy at Singapore: A Study of the American Council on Public Affairs

Strategy at Singapore: A Study of the American Council on Public Affairs

Strategy at Singapore: A Study of the American Council on Public Affairs

Excerpt

The surrender of Singapore had far-reaching effects upon America. The seriousness of its loss is a measure of its importance. As Dr. Miller points out so well in this timely study of the American Council on Public Affairs, Singapore was far more than another British out- post. It was and will continue to be of tremendous concern to the United States. As long as we remain in need of vital raw materials in the Far East, as long as we have any interest in Australia and New Zealand, just so long will Singapore remain strategically vital to our interests.

This study is an accurate and stimulating account of the conception, construction, and destruction of the naval base at Singapore. It is an illuminating analysis of the difficulties which the United Kingdom faced between 1922 and 1942 in determining the foreign policy of the British Empire. The political, military and naval problems involving Singapore perplexed successive governments of the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the Malay States. At times these problems defied the wisdom and understanding of the British people.

It is, of course, comparatively easy to say that Singapore could have been held if this or that had been done. But there can be no denying that Britain did everything within her power. It is, after all, by no means a simple matter to hold together a great empire open to attack on a score of fronts. In view of the situation that confronted the British government after the fall of Dunkirk, it is amazing that her forces have been so successful since that event. Those who are fond of hurling the taunt "too little and too late" should soberly calculate the amount of force necessary adequately to defend positions and territories scattered around the globe.

The United States has faced difficulties in the Far East not unlike . . .

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