Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western Migration, 1856-1860, with Contemporary Journals, Accounts, Reports; and Rosters of Members of the Ten Handcart Companies

Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western Migration, 1856-1860, with Contemporary Journals, Accounts, Reports; and Rosters of Members of the Ten Handcart Companies

Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western Migration, 1856-1860, with Contemporary Journals, Accounts, Reports; and Rosters of Members of the Ten Handcart Companies

Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western Migration, 1856-1860, with Contemporary Journals, Accounts, Reports; and Rosters of Members of the Ten Handcart Companies

Excerpt

Mormonism, from the days of its founding in 1830, has been a missionary religion, vigorously proselyting the "honest in heart." Zion, as a gathering place for the faithful, was proclaimed almost from the beginning. And "gathering to Zion" became a powerful force in the rise and development of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (better known as the Mormon Church).

The idea reached its fullest vigor in the mid-nineteenth century, when the missionary efforts in England had succeeded so well that thousands of enthusiastic converts clamored for the privilege of going to the "Promised Land." The fervor reached such a pitch that obstacles and sacrifices were no longer deterrents; many were so eager to go that they offered to "walk from their homes to Liverpool, and from New York to the Great Salt Lake."

With thousands of the poor "panting to gather to Zion," and with inadequate means for wagon transportation, there was born the plan for travel by handcarts to Utah.

The startling story of that unique experiment is disclosed on the ensuing pages of this volume.

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