The Psychology of Sexual Victimization: A Handbook

The Psychology of Sexual Victimization: A Handbook

The Psychology of Sexual Victimization: A Handbook

The Psychology of Sexual Victimization: A Handbook

Synopsis

A scholarly handbook focusing on variables that assist in confronting and preventing the forms of sexual victimization, i.e. rape, child abductions, battering, sexual harassment, and incest. Resources include parent and teacher training, public education and awareness, and psychotherapeutic techniques for families and friends of victims as well as the victims themselves.

Excerpt

I began outlining the issues discussed in this book after some experiences I had as principal of my own firm that deals with education, training, and expert witness consulting in academic and workplace sexual harassment and as a member of several organizations dealing with educational and work equity. One of the first experiences was attending a conference on child abuse, with Matilda Cuomo (her husband, Mario, was a former New York State governor) presiding. I was attending this conference on behalf of the Schenectady, New York, and New York State Chapter of the Business and Professional Women's Organization, of which I was a member and officer. In a paper I presented, I indicated that each week in New York State, an average of four women are murdered as a result of domestic violence. The extremes of this violence are demonstrated by the fact that women in North America are more likely to be killed by their partners than by anyone else. More women are abused by their husbands or boyfriends than are injured in car accidents or muggings. Being battered has direct implications on a mother's effectiveness as a parent. Her role as a parent is demeaned through their victimization because the dysfunction and disorganization of the home offer little nurturance, support, structure, or supervision for children.

The Business and Professional Women's Organization pointed out to Mrs. Cuomo that battering is a workplace concern and that employers must respond to the needs of the mothers and children, in collaboration with community agencies. According to New York State's Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, approximately 25% of workplace problems, such as lower productivity, absenteeism, and excessive use of health benefits, are . . .

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