Political Parties of the Middle East and North Africa

Political Parties of the Middle East and North Africa

Political Parties of the Middle East and North Africa

Political Parties of the Middle East and North Africa

Synopsis

This major reference provides comprehensive coverage of the political parties and movements in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa. Frank Tachau and a group of prestigious scholars and internationally acclaimed experts on the region's political history describe the formation, evolution, and impact of parties in each of the 19 countries that are surveyed, and they also discuss Palestinian and Kurdish political groups. Bibliographies accompany each chapter. The two appendixes are chronologies of important dates in the political developments in the various countries and in the region and information about the genealogies of parties where country histories are particularly complex. A general index and internal cross-references make the data about the parties easily accessible to the political scientists, historians, and Middle Eastern students, teachers, and professionals for whom the survey is designed.

Excerpt

Formal political parties have played a significant but tangential role in the internal affairs of the countries of the Arabian Peninsula. Liberal reform movements advocated the establishment of representative advisory councils in Bahrain, Kuwait, and Dubai (now one of the United Arab Emirates) during the 1920s and 1930s. The suppression of these movements led some prominent dissidents to form nascent parties-in-exile, while others became active members of regional political organizations, most notably the Movement of Arab Nationalists (MAN) (see chapters on Jordan and The Palestinians). Such associations provided a potent alternative means of generating political legitimacy to the ties of kinship and tenets of Islamic law exercised by the ruling families and their allies. Consequently, local authorities openly colluded with one another throughout the 1940s and 1950s to limit the influence and spread of political parties in the Gulf area.

General opprobrium continued to lie at the heart of Gulf rulers' attitudes . . .

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