Natural Resources, Growth, and Development: Economics, Ecology and Resource-Scarcity

Natural Resources, Growth, and Development: Economics, Ecology and Resource-Scarcity

Natural Resources, Growth, and Development: Economics, Ecology and Resource-Scarcity

Natural Resources, Growth, and Development: Economics, Ecology and Resource-Scarcity

Synopsis

This volume combines economics and ecology in a penetrating examination of the natural resources and environmental issues arising from economic growth, development, and change. The author focuses particular attention on the environmental consequences of economic change and argues that the management and conservation of biological resources is a requirement for sustainable economic growth. By setting traditional economic issues within their wider environmental contexts and by covering issues not ordinarily addressed by economists, Tisdell offers an important new perspective on the problem of resource scarcity.

Excerpt

In the past there has been a tendency to consider economics and ecology independently in examining economic growth and development. But such an approach is no longer tenable, as will be apparent from this book. To an ever-increasing extent economic activity, growth, and development determine the ecological environment of the globe, and this, in turn, places limits on the sustainability of economic activities. Thus economic change, growth, and development need to be assessed in terms of ecological economics. The approach taken in this book to consider issues in economic development combines economics and ecology, the approach recommended in the World Conservation Strategy (IUCN, 1980) and by the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) established by the General Assembly of the United Nations. This, however, is not to say that I agree with all the policy recommendations contained in the World Conservation Strategy and in Our Common Future (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987).

In this book I have tried to examine traditional issues in economic development within their wider environmental context, as well as to cover issues not traditionally addressed by economists. Thus I hope . . .

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