Violence in Dating Relationships: Emerging Social Issues

Violence in Dating Relationships: Emerging Social Issues

Violence in Dating Relationships: Emerging Social Issues

Violence in Dating Relationships: Emerging Social Issues

Synopsis

"This extremely valuable collection of fourteen chapters is divided into two sections, with the first section covering research on physical abuse in dating relationships and the second section covering the issue of sexual abuse in dating relationships. With the increasing public awareness of and concern about acquaintance rape, this is an excellent and timely book. It should be in the library of any researcher who studies violence against women and it would also be an invaluable resource for any college faculty or administrator who seeks to provide a healthy educational environment for all students." The Community Psychologist

Excerpt

Included in this volume are 14 pioneering chapters on physical and sexual abuse in dating relationships. With contributors from a wide variety of disciplines, including sociology, criminology, psychology, psychiatry, women's studies, and policy analysis, this book provides an interdisciplinary and comprehensive review of the fields of physical and sexual abuse in dating relationships. Additionally, new and provocative empirical work on dating abuse is presented.

The first section, "Physical Abuse in Dating Relationships," provides estimates of the prevalence of physical abuse in dating relationships and compares dating violence with cohabiting and marital violence. It also provides the reader with new theoretical and empirical research on the antecedents and consequences of physical abuse while dating. First, Sugarman and Hotaling review the literature on physical abuse while dating and provide estimates of the incidence of dating violence. They highlight the risk factors associated with dating violence, and discuss how dating violence compares with marital violence.

In the chapter that follows, Stets and Straus compare physical abuse among those who date, cohabit, or are married. Using the same measure of physical abuse across these different marital status groups, they find that abuse is more common and severe in cohabiting relationships than in the other groups. They posit that the high rate of assault among cohabiting couples may be due to social isolation, issues of autonomy and control, and lack of investment in the relationship. The first two chapters provide the reader with a general understanding against which the remaining chapters in this section of the book can be read.

Riggs and O'Leary present a theoretical model of courtship aggression. Their model contains two general categories of variables: contextual (such as individual characteristics) and situational (such as precipitating events). The former . . .

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