Women, Society, the State, and Abortion: A Structuralist Analysis

Women, Society, the State, and Abortion: A Structuralist Analysis

Women, Society, the State, and Abortion: A Structuralist Analysis

Women, Society, the State, and Abortion: A Structuralist Analysis

Synopsis

List of Tables List of Figures Acknowledgments Abortion: Political Controversy The Consequences of Abortion Historical Overview Legal, Biological and Philosophical Issues in the Abortion Debate Medical, Ethical, and Theological Views on Abortion Structuralism as a Theory and Methodology for Analyzing the Abortion Debate Summary of Interviews with Pro-Life and Pro-Choice Representatives A Structuralist Analysis of the Abortion Debate Appendix Selected Bibliography Index

Excerpt

The previous chapters presented a review and a synthesis of relevant literature on the present abortion policy in the United States, the consequences of that policy, and the controversy that has emerged from it. the history of abortion was discussed both from a global and a national perspective. Literature from various disciplines that have significant interest in abortion issues was reviewed and analyzed. These disciplines included law, biology, philosophy, medicine, theology, and ethics.

This review and analysis attempted to point out the diverse and in some cases contradictory views of various scholars. in addition, the analysis shows that no one of these disciplines alone nor all of them combined can provide definitive answers to the abortion controversy. Many well-meaning people, however, on both sides of the debate claim that they have found answers in the literature that clearly prove that human life begins at a certain point or does not begin at a certain point in gestation. These claims may satisfy those who make them, but it is clear that a vast amount of uncertainty exists concerning the exact time human life begins. As a result, there is a wide variety of opinions on the nature and morality of abortion.

The current situation raises a number of questions that are not adequately addressed in the literature including Why do advocates on both sides of the controversy believe so strongly that they are right? Why do so many genuinely good and sincere people on both sides disagree so vehemently on this issue? Why is the current law of the land not acceptable to some on . . .

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