Strategic Job Modeling: Working at the Core of Integrated Human Resources

Strategic Job Modeling: Working at the Core of Integrated Human Resources

Strategic Job Modeling: Working at the Core of Integrated Human Resources

Strategic Job Modeling: Working at the Core of Integrated Human Resources

Synopsis

(USE FOR PRACTITIONER/BUSINESS PIECES)
In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, a company's success hinges on the quality of its people. People set strategy, make decisions, build relationships, and drive change. Businesses possess a powerful advantage if their people do their jobs better and faster than the competition. The need for more sophisticated, integrated, and strategically linked human resource applications (e.g., selection systems, training programs, and performance management interventions) is recasting the very role of HR. One of the critical tools in the HR professionals' toolkit that has been used to create these applications is job analysis. However, much of today's job analysis practice has failed to keep up with the evolutionary pace.

This book is about a "next generation" job analysis method that involves translating business strategies into work performance and competency requirements, and using this information and data to create an architecture that can be used to support the sophisticated HR applications and enterprise resource planning systems that will be a part of high-performance third millennium organizations. Numerous case studies, applied examples, and project management tips contribute to the practice-oriented design of the book to illustrate a personnel research activity that is essentially an ongoing organizational development intervention.

(USE THIS COPY FOR TEXTBOOK PIECES) The business landscape is changing and becoming more complex. Furthermore, human resources is at the vortex of much of what is changing. The need for more sophisticated, integrated, and strategically linked human resource applications (e.g., selection systems, training programs, and performance management interventions) is recasting the very role of HR. One of the critical tools in the HR professionals' toolkit that has been used to create these applications is job analysis. However, much of today's job analysis practice has failed to keep up with the evolutionary pace.

This book is about a "next generation" job analysis method that involves translating business strategies into work performance and competency requirements, and using this information and data to create an architecture that can be used to support the sophisticated HR applications and enterprise resource planning systems that will be a part of high-performance third millennium organizations. Numerous case studies, applied examples, and project management tips contribute to the practice-oriented design of the book to illustrate a personnel research activity that is essentially an ongoing organizational development intervention.

Excerpt

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but seeing with new eyes.

--Marcel Proust

The concept of job analysis has a deep reach into the past of human history. Systematic procedures for identifying and describing the important work-related aspects of a job and the associated worker requirements can be traced back to the early Greeks. In discussing the needs of the ideal state, Socrates noted that different kinds of people, with different mixes of special skills, are required to satisfy different needs.

The role of systematic analysis procedures gained prominence in the early 1900s when their information-generating properties were recognized by industrial engineers, management theorists, personnel specialists, and psychologists. The term job analysis evolved about this time, and enthusiasm for the subject grew as the basic ideas formed the foundation of Taylor's scientific management.

Although the popularity of the practice has waxed and waned since the 1920s, the same fundamental ideas have been used to support a steadily increasing range of organizational applications. In the 1940s, Zerga identified more than 20 uses of job analysis information. In the late 1990s, the results of job analysis practice are woven into the fabric of virtually every application involving an organization's people resources.

However, as the 21st century looms just ahead, job analysis is at a crossroad. Job analysis practices in the late 1990s are a product of the mass-production approach to thinking about work, where division of labor and job simplification are a prerequisite for high-volume production and interchangeable parts. , , Just as it is questionable whether this philosophy of work will equip organizations for success in a business environment characterized by unprecedented competition and change, one can question whether current approaches to job . . .

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