Political Change in Morocco

Political Change in Morocco

Political Change in Morocco

Political Change in Morocco

Excerpt

THE Moroccan people have known three political regimes in the twentieth century. At the turn of the century the country was ruled by the traditional central government, the Makhzen, which had existed in various forms for nearly a millennium. From 1912 to early 1956 final authority rested with the Protectorate powers, France and Spain. The last twenty years of this period were marked with increasingly bitter and effective nationalist agitation, which culminated in the independent Morocco of today. The subject of this inquiry will be the politics of independent Morocco from 1955 to 1959, the most recent period of rapid political development. Partly by adaptation of old habits and partly by innovation a new political structure has been created. The magnitude of the change in these four years probably compares with that of the previous millennium in its direct effect on the lives of all Moroccans. Although there are many controversies over Morocco's accomplishments since independence, she has successfully created a nation. This act bears further examination, for it will be repeated in many countries in the southern half of the world in the coming decade.

In this book Morocco becomes a case study for the student of comparative politics and particularly for the student of the nonWestern world. The practical lessons to be learned from the Moroccan experience are rivaled by the insights provided for theoretical formulations. The analytical benefits of the study can best be distinguished by emphasizing our need to understand how the creation of a nation affects the lives of all its members or citizens. To think of the nation or the introduction of national politics as the property of only the advanced segment of the population can be grossly misleading, but to think of politics in more comprehensive terms requires suitable concepts and theory. Although the formulation of new frameworks of inquiry is in itself a major endeavor, this book tries to suggest what seem to be the more promising ways for improving our ability to analyze new nations.

The rapid political and social changes that are characteristic of the emerging countries of the world have compelled scholars to re-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.