D. W. Winnicott: A Biographical Portrait

D. W. Winnicott: A Biographical Portrait

D. W. Winnicott: A Biographical Portrait

D. W. Winnicott: A Biographical Portrait

Synopsis

"Kahr writes in a clear, flowing and economical way, revealing an honest, genuinely scientific, attitude of enquiry.... I recommend this book as a stimulus to discussion and further research on Winnicott's life and work." -- From the Foreword by Dr. Susanna Isaacs Elmhirst

"Without animus or blinding admiration, Kahr guides us towards seeing a Winnicott of flesh and history, a Winnicott of extraordinary resolve, as well as complicated weaknesses and tribulations. This biographical Winnicott now stands alongside the authorial Winnicott, giving us a new point of reference. By drawing a picture of Donald Winnicott's origins, Brett Kahr allows us to appreciate more deeply the bounds and dimensions of the originality of this extraordinary psychoanalyst." -- From the Introduction by Dr. George Makari

Excerpt

With the obvious exception of Sigmund Freud, perhaps no other figure in the history of psychoanalysis has contributed as much to our understanding of the origins and treatment of mental distress as Donald Winnicott has done. Winnicott (1919) first encountered psychoanalytic ideas as a young medical student at St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London, while seeking to understand his often baffling dreams. After reading Freud (1900) magnum opus, The Interpretation of Dreams, Winnicott decided that he would devote his life to the study of the human mind -- in particular, that he would bring psychoanalytic ideas and concepts to the attention of the wider British public. Throughout the following five decades, Winnicott dedicated himself single-mindedly to the study and treatment of human psychopathology, and he did so with such verve and determination that he often became ill from overwork. By the time he died in 1971, he had already completed nine volumes of his written work (Winnicott, 1931a, 1945a, 1949a, 1957a, 1957b, 1958a, 1964a, 1965a, 1965b): after his death, a number of devoted editors, initially spearheaded by his widow Clare Winnicott, ensured the publication of no fewer than twelve . . .

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