The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

Synopsis

"Meyer Weinberg has written an excellent book concerning the promises and pitfalls faced by minority students during the past 30 years of desegregation. He brings to bear a clarity of analysis that makes for excellent reading for researchers and policymakers. More unusual, and to the author's credit, the book offers insights to parents trying to encourage their children to succeed in school.... Researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and parents will find this an excellent book, and it is highly recommended." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

Excerpt

This book examines critically a large amount of research on the schooling of poor and minority children, carried out during the 1970s and the earliest 1980s. Higher education is also discussed. The principal viewpoint of the analysis emerges from a conviction that effectiveness of schooling is closely bound up with equality and equity of education. Class and race barriers ensure that poor and minority children will receive ineffective education. Those who seek to abstract educational effectiveness from its social and racial context are mistaken. Decade upon decade of experience and research, both here and abroad, suggest as much. The search for equal and equitable education, on the other hand, seems short-sighted in the absence of a concern for educational effectiveness.

As one sifts through the mass of research reported here a realization dawns that we are beginning to overcome the heritage of the 1960s. That decade, deservedly renowned for its rebirth of social conscience, also bequeathed to us a surfeit of sentimental paternalism which only now has begun to ebb. Educational researchers and policy-makers, especially, embodied a social philosophy and a methodology profoundly unfitted to solve the challenges of that decade or of the following two. The earmarks of this orientation were a view of the uneducated as having brought their ignorance upon themselves, and a stance of neutral innocence of schools in this process of uneducating. Omitted, however, were an acknowledgment of the structural racism that largely guided the schools, and the significance of growing parental organization as part of the burgeoning civil rights movement.

The sweeping ineffectiveness of America's urban schools was first made into a national issue by that movement, as was a concern for equality and equity of education. Educational research, however, resisted these issues as "political" and continued, more or less, in the usual pursuit of knowledge with images of raceless, benevolent classrooms. Instructional failures were attributed to individual failings of students whose race or economic status . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.