John A. Logan, Stalwart Republican from Illinois

John A. Logan, Stalwart Republican from Illinois

John A. Logan, Stalwart Republican from Illinois

John A. Logan, Stalwart Republican from Illinois

Excerpt

This book is the second volume of a two-volume biography of Logan--Union general, representative, senator, vice-presidential candidate, and champion of the Civil War veteran. The first volume "Black Jack:" John A. Logan and Southern Illinois in the Civil War Era, dealt with Logan's life from birth to 1867. It traced his rise as southern Illinois' leading political spokesman, focused on the volunteer general's Civil War career, and concluded with Logan's change of party, from Democrat to Republican, in 1867.

John A. Logan emerged from the Civil War a Union military hero. Taking advantage of his martial fame, Logan reentered Illinois politics and served in the House for four years before going on to fourteen years in the Senate. In 1884 he was the Republican nominee for vice-president in James G. Blaine's unsuccessful bid for the presidency. Logan's career from 1867 to his death in 1886 touched many of the most important developments in the United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. He was a House manager in Andrew Johnson's impeachment and a friend and supporter of President Ulysses S. Grant. The Illinois senator figured prominently in the disputed election of 1876 as well as in the colorful election of 1884. In addition, Logan was a founder and longtime leader of the Grand Army of the Republic, that politically powerful veterans' organization.

This volume investigates some of the principal questions of the era. Reconstruction, the Negro's adjustment to freedom, patronage politics versus civil service reform, money problems, and congressional struggles with the executive are all parts of Logan's career.

No other scholarly biography of John A. Logan has been published. Most treatments of the soldier-politician are partisan campaign biographies written in the 1880s, the last published in 1887 by George F. Dawson. That work was read and edited by Logan and is biased and inaccurate. The most deceptive work on Logan was written by his wife. MaryLogan

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