The Mary Myth: On the Femininity of God

The Mary Myth: On the Femininity of God

The Mary Myth: On the Femininity of God

The Mary Myth: On the Femininity of God

Excerpt

We moderns think of religion as creed, code, and cult. It is a series of propositions to be believed in, a set of moral practices to be followed, a body of ritual to be observed. A man's religiousness is measured by his denominational attendance, his church affiliation, his acceptance of certain doctrinal propositions, his adherence to certain moral norms, and his performance of certain approved rituals. It is all very neat, orderly, and rational. If the sociology of religion has generally not progressed beyond the measurement of such phenomena, the reason is that most sociologists of religion, like most of the rest of us, are very much products of the Enlightenment, and see religion as essentially propositional.

In fact, however, such a rationalistic view of religion describes neither what religion has meant to people in the past nor what it means to most people today. Religion is humankind's way of wrestling with the ultimate; it is the set of answers, usually in nonpropositional form, to the most fundamental and basic questions a human has about the purpose of life and of the world in which he finds himself. Indeed, religion is an explanation of what things are all about. Creed, code, cult, church are all derivatives; they flow from the basic worldview, the fundamental interpretive scheme. They are important, indeed, but decidedly secondary to the intuition of the real, which is the primal and . . .

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