What Is Life?

What Is Life?

What Is Life?

What Is Life?

Excerpt

My aim in writing this popular book on scientific topics has been to reach as Wide an audience as possible, that is to say to write nothing which the ordinary reader cannot follow, but yet to include a fact or two which will be outside the reading of most university students, and to try to put old facts in a new way. The latter activity is of extreme importance, because it is the method by which great theoretical advances are made, and it is worth doing even on a very small scale. Curiously enough, some of my most important theoretical work, published in scientific journals in recent years, has originated from articles which I wrote in the Daily Worker. In writing them I had to arrange well-known facts in a different manner to that in which they are arranged in scientific texts` and in consequence I saw new relations between them. So perhaps my professional colleagues may find the germs of some new ideas in what I have written on their subjects.

This book is permeated by one point of view, namely, that people can and should think scientifically about themselves. This point of view has led me, along with thousands of other European scientists, fair numbers in Asia and Latin America, and so far comparatively few in North America, to adopt Marxism as a working hypothesis about how men behave and how changes, both in nature and in society, occur.

Many Americans think that Marxism is nonsense, and dangerous nonsense. But k is striking how little they know about it. This is not entirely their fault. Their press and radio take good care that they should not know how people are thinking in Europe.

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