The Abolition of War: The Case against War and Questions and Answers concerning War

The Abolition of War: The Case against War and Questions and Answers concerning War

The Abolition of War: The Case against War and Questions and Answers concerning War

The Abolition of War: The Case against War and Questions and Answers concerning War

Excerpt

It has taken the writer ten long years since 1914 to reach his present position upon the moral problem involved in war. As the change which has taken place in his own thinking may be typical of the experience of many who are going through the same transition today, he feels constrained to enumerate the stages through which he has passed, for the possible benefit of others who may be perplexed by the same problem. As confessions cannot be written in the third person, he asks the reader's permission to use the first. He speaks, however, personally and un- officially, not as representing the views of any organization or denomination.

I am an American of Puritan Pilgrim ancestry, a direct descendant of John Alden and Priscilla, and of Samuel Eddy, who came to Amer ica . . .

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