The New Vision, 1928, 4th Rev. Ed: And, Abstract of an Artist

The New Vision, 1928, 4th Rev. Ed: And, Abstract of an Artist

The New Vision, 1928, 4th Rev. Ed: And, Abstract of an Artist

The New Vision, 1928, 4th Rev. Ed: And, Abstract of an Artist

Excerpt

It was in Berlin in 1922 that I first met Moholy-Nagy. Impressed by the character and direction of his work, I offered him a professorship at the "Bauhaus," the school of modern design which I had founded and was then directing at Weimar.

Moholy was one of my most active colleagues in building up the Bauhaus; much that it accomplished stands to his credit. The opportunities that the Bauhaus afforded for art of every kind must have proved especially inspiring to a nature so versatile, and a talent so many-sided as Moholy's. He constantly developed new ideas. These proved as fruitful to the school as to his own development. But his varied activities -- in photography, theater, films, typography, and advertising design -- neither diminished nor disseminated Moholy's powers as a painter. On the contrary, all his successful efforts in these mediums were simply indirect but necessary by-paths on his route to the conquest of a new conception of space in painting. This conception is for me his major contribution to the leadership of modern art. He succeeded in projecting various interests into his painting; he thus created a new pictorial unity, peculiar to himself.

His conception of spatial problems may be difficult to understand. We can perhaps best explain the task of such an abstract painter by the example of music. Like painting, musical composition consists of form and content. But its form is only in part a product of the composer, since, in order to make his musical ideas comprehensible to any third person, he makes use of counterpoint, which is a convention agreeing to divide the world of sound into certain intervals specified by fixed laws. These laws of counterpoint, harmony, and scales vary among different peoples and epochs, and . . .

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