Seneca: His Tenne Tragedies - Vol. 2

Seneca: His Tenne Tragedies - Vol. 2

Seneca: His Tenne Tragedies - Vol. 2

Seneca: His Tenne Tragedies - Vol. 2

Excerpt

Although (Gentle Reader) thou mayst perhaps thinke mee arrogant, for that I onely among so many fine wittes and towardly youth (with which England this day florisheth) have enterprised to set forth in english this present piece of the flowre of all writers, Seneca, as who say, not fearing what graver heads might judge of me, in attempting so hard a thing, yet upon well pondering what ensueth, I trust both thy selfe shalt cleare thine owne suspicion, and thy chaunged opinion shal judge of me more rightfull sentence. For neither have I taken this worke first in hand, as once entending it should come to light (of well doynge wherof I utterly displayed) and beynge done but for myne owne private exercise, I am in myne opinion herein blameles, thoughe I have (to prove my selfe) privately taken the part which pleased me best of so excellent an author, for better is tyme spent in the best then other, and at first to attempt the hardest writers, shall make a man more prompt to translate the easier with more facility. But now since by request, and frendship of those, to whom I could denye nothinge, this worke agaynst my will extorted is out of my hands, I needes must crave thy pacience in reading, and facility of judgement: when thou shalt apparently se my witles lacke of learning, prayng thee to consider how hard a thing it is for mee to touch at ful in all poynths the authors mynd, (beyng in many places verye harde and doubtfull, . . .

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