Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Hawthorne

Excerpt

"To insure the greatest efficiency in the dart, the harpooneers of this world must start to their feet from out of idleness, and not from out of toil ." -- "Moby-Dick."

THE thirty-eight New England youths who made up the class of 1825 at Bowdoin College, in the recently admitted State of Maine, uttered their mutual leave-takings in the late summer of that year with probably no more than the usual reminiscent regret, and no more than the usual sanguine inspection of the auguries. A sedate youth from Portland, who was to be known as the chief poet of his time, had just delivered himself of a "commencement part" in the form of an essay on Our Native Writers. Other parts had been taken by a future Abolitionist and temperance agitator, and by an ill-fated future Congressman; and a young man who was to be Paymaster-general of the navy during the Civil War, and who had failed to qualify for a part, had been one of a club of fourteen formed on the basis of that amiable ignominy. Commencement over, these recent cleavages became as unreal as the more sweeping distinctions of the remote years ahead; and both "ins" and "outs" trudged similarly home to take up, in their various inconspicuous ways, the study of law in New Hampshire attorneys' offices, or the study of theology at Andover, or the pursuit of commerce at Bangor.

None was to be more inconspicuous than the son of a . . .

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