The Evolution of Love

The Evolution of Love

The Evolution of Love

The Evolution of Love

Synopsis

Lampert presents the story of love: when, why, and how love became a central experience of humans. She sheds new insights as to who we fall in love with, why our sexual life is so full of contradictions, and from where the behavioral repertoire of lovers came. Based upon the most current scientific information, this book is written for every educated person.

Excerpt

The theory of evolution has perhaps become the strongest and most central tool of thought for those struggling to explain the world. Traditionally, this theory has been employed by biologists who explain fauna and flora, and are slightly apprehensive about explaining humans. In recent years, the boundaries of this tradition have been breaking down, and those whose interests lie in the human sciences--sociologists, anthropologists, historians, economists, philosophers, physicians, geneticists, and psychologists--have discovered the greatness of the evolution theory and want to make use of it. The first obstacle that hinders the study of humans as a result of natural selection processes is the concept of the soul. People accept the description of the evolution of our body with relative ease. It is easy to understand that feet were selected for their ability to bear us, and hands for their ability to bear booty. But love is "spiritual"; it is not to be constrained in the dryness and simplicity of biology, but is to be left floating ethereal, innocent of any material reality.

In his genius, Darwin understood a hundred and fifty years ago that mental characteristics are hereditary and therefore subject to the laws of natural selection, in the same way that physical traits are. Through wise observation of his own children's development, he remarked on fears that were not the result of any experience, but appeared in all children at the same age. It can, therefore, be concluded that these fears are hereditary. He also noticed that, starting at the age of two, his sons found the talent and inclination to throw objects at a target, whereas his daughters did not. Again he asked himself whether the . . .

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