Emotions and Anxiety: New Concepts, Methods, and Applications

Emotions and Anxiety: New Concepts, Methods, and Applications

Emotions and Anxiety: New Concepts, Methods, and Applications

Emotions and Anxiety: New Concepts, Methods, and Applications

Excerpt

More than a quarter century has passed since the explosion of research on anxiety and emotion in the early 1950s, and considerable progress has been made in the measurement of anxiety and its treatment. During the past decade, there have also been significant advances in theory and research on anxiety and emotion, but many investigators are not yet familiar with these "new concepts." This book will be of interest to behavioral and medical scientists concerned with the topics of anxiety and emotion, and should be useful as a supplementary text in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in personality and motivation.

The book is divided into four major parts. The chapters in Part I examine the origins of fear, anxiety, and other emotions. Self-report and psychophysiological approaches to the measurement of anxiety are considered in Part II. Recent research evidence regarding the effects of anxiety on the behavior of normal and abnormal subjects is reported in Part III. The final section is concerned with behavioral approaches to the assessment and treatment of anxiety in clinical settings.

The three chapters in Part I reflect the current Zeitgeist in psychology, which gives increasing emphasis to biological and genetic determinants of emotion, in contrast to the extreme environmentalism of psychoanalysis and radical behaviorism. A second major trend in Part I that continues throughout this volume is a persistent concern with the role of cognition in the mediation of emotional behavior. In Chapter 1, Suomi and Harlow examine the evolution of fear as an adaptive motive. Their observations of primate behavior reveal that grossly novel stimuli consistently evoke a variety of unlearned responses, including characteristic facial expressions. Such observations lead Suomi and Harlow to challenge traditional explanations of conditioned fear as resulting from the association of previously neutral stimuli with pain. They also discuss Sackett's astounding . . .

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