Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics, and Whiteness

Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics, and Whiteness

Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics, and Whiteness

Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics, and Whiteness

Synopsis

"Dismantling White Privilege critically interrogates whiteness across contexts, from the experiential level to the different ways in which whiteness is deployed in contemporary cultural politics. The editors and contributors contend that "marking" whiteness is an important step in dismantling white privilege within the context of concerns for equity and social justice. Significant to this anthology is linking analyses of whiteness to the discourse of critical pedagogy, especially around constructing "pedagogies of whiteness." Investigating whiteness in its many manifestations, Dismantling White Privilege represents a necessary advance concerning the intersection among race, culture, and pedagogy." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

In the 1960s, a tremendous discourse or conversation burst forth from "the hood": the white man was a "blond blue-eyed devil." Associated largely with black militant groups like the Black Muslims, this notion resonated for many of us who have lived with white racism in the United States. Still, few blacks believe that whites are the anti-Christ. Even back then, it was evident that, ultimately, the pursuit of a better world order would not permit us to construct revolutionary racial identities through the demonizing of whites. We knew that, in the final analysis, it would be necessary to to construct identities that are inclusive and communal (Gresson 1977; 1978). Images such as "blond blue-eyed devil," while powerful at one level, failed to allow sufficient space for white identity enlargement or cross-racial coalitions based on humanistic values and principles.

White Studies has revealed a similar discursive dialectic and trajectory, from the incipient scholarly gaze upon "whiteness" as symbol and substance to recent understandings that it is complex, contradictory, and capable of transformation. In Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics and Whiteness, Leila Villaverde and Nelson Rodriguez and their authors present an imaginative and exciting continuance of what might be termed the recovery school within White Studies. Arguing that there is value in "whiteness" and that its "existential evils" can be transformed through emanicapatory critiques and campaigns, the essays in this work avoid the temptation to essentialize "white identity." By initiating specific critiques of "white privilege," these authors point to the need to name and . . .

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